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Polyporus squamosus (Huds.) Fr. 1821

Polyporus squamosus-Meise2.jpg <b><i>Poecilimon birandi</b></i> Karabağ, 1950 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/02/18/20120218100700-3a9d9d16-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Veronica syriaca</i></b> Roem. & Schult.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/04/16/20110416225603-a8b1ed78-th.jpg><b><i>Poecilimon birandi</b></i> Karabağ, 1950 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/02/18/20120218100700-3a9d9d16-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Veronica syriaca</i></b> Roem. & Schult.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/04/16/20110416225603-a8b1ed78-th.jpg><b><i>Poecilimon birandi</b></i> Karabağ, 1950 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/02/18/20120218100700-3a9d9d16-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Veronica syriaca</i></b> Roem. & Schult.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/04/16/20110416225603-a8b1ed78-th.jpg><b><i>Poecilimon birandi</b></i> Karabağ, 1950 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/02/18/20120218100700-3a9d9d16-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Veronica syriaca</i></b> Roem. & Schult.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/04/16/20110416225603-a8b1ed78-th.jpg>

Polyporus squamosus (Huds.) Fr. 1821
Family: Polyporaceae
Common names: Dryad's saddle, Pheasant's back mushroom [En], Polypore écailleux [Fr], Zadelzwam [Nl], Schuppiger Porling [De]

Meise, BRABANT ● Belgium

Description: This mushroom is commonly attached to dead logs or stumps at one point with a thick stem. Generally, the fruit body is 8–30 cm (3–12 in) across and up to 10 cm (4 in) thick. The body can be yellow to brown and has "squamules" or scales on its upper side. On the underside one can see the pores that are characteristic of the genus Polyporus; they are made up of tubes packed together closely. The tubes are between 1 and 12 mm long. The stalk is thick and short, up to 5 cm (2.0 in) long. The fruit body will produce a white spore print if laid onto a sheet of paper. They can be found alone, in clusters of two or three, or forming shelves. Young specimens are soft but toughen with age. It is particularly common on dead elm and is also found on living maple trees.

Biology : It commonly fruits in the spring, occasionally during autumn, and rarely during other seasons.

Habitat: It plays an important role in woodland ecosystems by decomposing wood, usually elm, but is occasionally a parasite on living trees. Other tree hosts include ash, beech, horse chestnut, lime, maple, plane tree, poplar, and willow.

Distribution: United States, Europe, Asia and Australia.

References:
Wikipedia, Polyporus squamosus



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