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Schizophyllum commune Fr., 1815

Schizophyllum commune-Ulupinar-Antalya1.jpg <b><i>Schizophyllum commune</b></i> Fr., 1815||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/02/20111202120835-68cb9f27-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Aristolochia stenosiphon</i></b> Davis & Khan ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/05/31/20110531214015-d5825aed-th.jpg><b><i>Schizophyllum commune</b></i> Fr., 1815||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/02/20111202120835-68cb9f27-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Aristolochia stenosiphon</i></b> Davis & Khan ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/05/31/20110531214015-d5825aed-th.jpg><b><i>Schizophyllum commune</b></i> Fr., 1815||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/02/20111202120835-68cb9f27-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Aristolochia stenosiphon</i></b> Davis & Khan ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/05/31/20110531214015-d5825aed-th.jpg><b><i>Schizophyllum commune</b></i> Fr., 1815||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/02/20111202120835-68cb9f27-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Aristolochia stenosiphon</i></b> Davis & Khan ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/05/31/20110531214015-d5825aed-th.jpg>

Schizophyllum commune Fr., 1815
Family: Schizophyllaceae
Common names: Split Gill [En], Schizophylle commun [Fr], Waaiertje [Nl], Gemeiner Spaltblättling [De]

Ulupinar, ANTALYA ● Turkey

Description: The cap is shell-shaped, with the tissue concentrated at the point of attachment, resembling a stem. It is often wavy and lobed, with a rigid margin when old. It is tough, felty and hairy, and slippery when moist. It is greyish white and up to 4 cm in diameter. The gills are pale reddish or grey, very narrow with a longitudinal split edge which becomes inrolled when wet; the only knows fungus with spit gills that are capable of retracting by movement. The gills, which produce basidiospores on their surface split when the mushroom dries out, earning this mushroom the common name Split Gill.

Biology: This saprobic fungus is found predominantly from autumn to spring. Unlike other mushroom species, the mycelium only has to produce one set of fruiting bodies per year, which can then dry out and rehydrate and keep functioning. It's a great strategy for reproduction. This species is also known to have more than 28,000 distinct sexes.

Habitat: Dead wood, in coniferous and deciduous forest.

Distribution: It is the world's most widely distributed mushroom, occurring on every continent except Antarctica.

Uses: Although European and US guidebooks list it as inedible, this is apparently due to differing standards of taste rather than known toxicity, being regarded with little culinary interest due to its tough texture. S. commune is, in fact, edible and widely consumed in Mexico and elsewhere in the tropics.

Caution: Some rare cases of sinusitis or bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by this fungus on humans or animal were reported.

References:
Wikipedia, Schizophyllum commune
Volk T., 2000. Schizophyllum commune



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Sunday 3 April 2011
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