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Cerambyx scopolii Fuessly, 1775 ♀

Cerambyx scopolii-F-Dinant3.jpg <b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170458-cec02cfe-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170506-1d327ad4-th.jpg><b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170458-cec02cfe-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170506-1d327ad4-th.jpg><b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170458-cec02cfe-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170506-1d327ad4-th.jpg><b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170458-cec02cfe-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Cerambyx scopolii</b></i> Fuessly, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/27/20120527170506-1d327ad4-th.jpg>

Cerambyx scopolii Fuessly, 1775 ♀
Common names: Capricorn beetle [En], Petit capricorne [Fr], Eikenboktor [Nl], Kleiner Eichenbock [De]

Dinant, NAMUR ● Belgium

Description: The body length is 17 - 28 mm. Males have very long antennae, while those of females slightly exceed the length of the body. Cerambyx scopolii is a little miniature Cerambyx cerdo, the great Capricorn beetle. But it is completely black and shiny while C. cerdo has the apex of elytra reddish brown and less rounded.

Biology: The life cycle is 2 - 3 years. The adults can be seen from May to August on flowers. Larvae are xylyphagous in deciduous trees including Quercus, Fagus, Carpinus, Salix, etc. Adults feed on pollen. This species is more diurnal than C. cerdo.

Habitat: Edges and clearing of deciduous forests, old orchards.

Distribution: Europe, Caucasus, Transcaucasia, North Africa, Near East.

References:
Reichholf-Riehm H., 1984. Les insectes, Guide vert poche, Solar.




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