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Gelis sp. Thunberg, 1827 ♀

Gelis sp-Meise.jpg <b><i>Lathraea clandestina</b></i> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/18/20121018215711-53ed594f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Apechthis quadridentata</b></i> Thomson 1877 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/16/20121016182414-8ffcca62-th.jpg><b><i>Lathraea clandestina</b></i> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/18/20121018215711-53ed594f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Apechthis quadridentata</b></i> Thomson 1877 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/16/20121016182414-8ffcca62-th.jpg><b><i>Lathraea clandestina</b></i> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/18/20121018215711-53ed594f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Apechthis quadridentata</b></i> Thomson 1877 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/16/20121016182414-8ffcca62-th.jpg><b><i>Lathraea clandestina</b></i> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/18/20121018215711-53ed594f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Apechthis quadridentata</b></i> Thomson 1877 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/10/16/20121016182414-8ffcca62-th.jpg>

Gelis sp. Thunberg, 1827 ♀
Maybe Gelis areator Panzer, 1804
Subspecies: Cryptinae

Meise, BRABANT ● Belgium

Description: The propodeum (first abdominal segment, fused with the thorax) of the Cryptinae is areolate. The female have a distinct ovipositor. The female of some species are also wingless.

Most species of the Gelis genus are wingless. Gelis areator is one of the few macropterous Gelis with strongly banded wings.

Biology: The most common hosts of Cryptinae are endopterygote pupae or prepupae enclosed in cocoons or plant tissue. However, some are endoparasitic and a few may be koinobionts. Furthermore, some species parasitize the egg sacs of Pseudoscorpionida and Araneae, and many can develop as secondary parasitoids (Goulet & Hubert, 1993).
Many species of Gelis are known to parasitize spider egg sacs, while others are hyperparasitoids, attacking the cocoons of braconid wasps or other ichneumons.

The hosts of the larvae of Gelis areator are Psychidae, Coleophoridae (cases); Araneae (egg cocoons); Chrysopidae, small Lepidoptera, Ichneumonidae & Braconidae (cocoons).

Distribution: Gelis areator is distributed in the Palearctic region, in North and Central Europe, in Asia and in South Africa.

References:
Discover Life
Waspweb



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