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Poecilimon sanctipauli Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878 ♂

Poecilimon sanctipauli-Koutsoutis-Rhodes.jpg <b><i>Silene dichotoma</b></i> subsp. <b><i>dichotoma</b></i>  Ehrh, 1792||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/02/01/20130201183531-b33f0656-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Serapias orientalis</b></i> ssp. <i><b>carica</b></i> H.Baumann & Kunkele, 1989||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/25/20120525200758-4aafcf59-th.jpg><b><i>Silene dichotoma</b></i> subsp. <b><i>dichotoma</b></i>  Ehrh, 1792||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/02/01/20130201183531-b33f0656-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Serapias orientalis</b></i> ssp. <i><b>carica</b></i> H.Baumann & Kunkele, 1989||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/25/20120525200758-4aafcf59-th.jpg><b><i>Silene dichotoma</b></i> subsp. <b><i>dichotoma</b></i>  Ehrh, 1792||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/02/01/20130201183531-b33f0656-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Serapias orientalis</b></i> ssp. <i><b>carica</b></i> H.Baumann & Kunkele, 1989||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/25/20120525200758-4aafcf59-th.jpg><b><i>Silene dichotoma</b></i> subsp. <b><i>dichotoma</b></i>  Ehrh, 1792||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/02/01/20130201183531-b33f0656-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Serapias orientalis</b></i> ssp. <i><b>carica</b></i> H.Baumann & Kunkele, 1989||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/05/25/20120525200758-4aafcf59-th.jpg>

Poecilimon sanctipauli Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878 ♂

Koutsoutis, RHODES ● Greece

Description: The body lenght is 20–32 mm. The prozona is slightly widening anteriorly. The dorsal surface of the pronotum is distinctly concave, the metazona is more raised than the prozona. The hind margin of the paranota is slightly convex. Both sexes have a black longitudinal band; the tegmina of the female are overlapping dorsally; the tegmina of the male are converging posteriorly.

Members of the P. sanctipauli group can be recognised by a combination of characters. Most important are the wide fastigium, short ovipositor and song characters.
The proposed phylogenetic relationships of the members of this group are written as [P. mytilenensis (P. pulcher, P. lodosi, P. sanctipauli)]. All species of the group are known from southwest Turkey and some east Aegean islands. The three species P. pulcher, P. lodosi and P. sanctipauli are morphologically and bioacoustically quite similar. P. sanctipauli and P. pulcher are distinct species, P. lodosi, however, possesses a combination of the key characters of the other two species.

Habitat: Poecilimon sanctipauli has been recorded from a variety of tree and shrub vegetation types in Greece and Turkey with an altitudinal range varying from sea level to locations > 1500 m a.s.l. (Willemse, 1982; Önder et al., 1999c; Ünal, 2000; etc.).

Distribution: The species is known from the southeastern Aegean (the Greek islands of Samos, Kos, Rhodos, Kalimnos, Simi, Lipsos and Leros) and soutwestern Turkey. Among the thirteen (or twelve) Poecilimon taxa the Aegean is currently known to hold, P. sanctipauli is one of the few reported to occur both in the Aegean and the Asian mainland coast (Willemse, 1982, 1984a; Heller & Reinhold, 1992; Willemse & Heller, 1992). It is speculated that the present-day distribution of the genus is a result of dispersal (and isolation) in the early tertiary Egeis by means of the Miocene small plates which then provided connections with European Asia (La Greca, 1999).

References:
Heller K.-G. & Sevgili H., 2005. Systematics and bioacoustics of the Poecilimon sanctipauli-group (Orthoptera: Tettigonioidea: Phaneropteridae) Eur. J. Entomol. 102(2):265-277.
Papapavlou K. P., 2005. New distributional data on the Orthoptera (Saltatoria) of the Northern Dodecanese (“Southern Sporadhes”) Archipelago, Greece. Graellsia, 61(1): 3-11




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Sunday 8 April 2012
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