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Boletus reticulatus Schaeff., 1763

Boletus reticulatus-Meise.JPG <i><b>Boletus chrysenteron</i></b> Bull., 1791||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111233641-43788724-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Boletus chrysenteron</i></b> Bull., 1791||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111233641-43788724-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Boletus chrysenteron</i></b> Bull., 1791||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111233641-43788724-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Boletus chrysenteron</i></b> Bull., 1791||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111233641-43788724-th.jpg>Thumbnails

Boletus reticulatus Schaeff., 1763
Syn.: Boletus aestivalis (Paulet) Fr., 1838
Common names: Summer cep [En], Cèpe d'été, Bolet réticulé [Fr], Vroeg eekhoorntjesbrood [Nl], Sommer-Steinpilz [De]

Meise, BRABANT ● Belgium

Description: The summer cep's fruiting body is a mushroom with a swollen bulbous stem, and large convex cap. The cap is more or less round and usually up to 20 centimetres in diameter. It bears a velvety brown, rust to chocolate cuticle which when dry often cracks to reveal the white flesh underneath, giving the appearance of a net.
The darker, more uniform shade and the velvety feel of the cap are a key feature distinguishing this species as is the vagueness or total absence of a white edge to the cap margin as seen in Boletus edulis. The tubes and pores of the hymenium are initially white, darkening with age to pale yellow and finally brown. The stipe is central (up to 16 cm in height) and has a strongly marked reticulated pattern with a variable white to brown colour.
The flesh is white and thick and remains firm if yellowish as the mushroom ages, and is often attacked by insect larvae. Its odour is pleasant.

Biology: It appears after hot and humid weather, from the start of summer until the end of autumn. It forms a symbiotic mycorrhizal relationship with species of oak (Quercus).

Habitat: Boletus reticulates grows on soil beneath mainly broadleaf trees, notably beech and oaks.

Distribution: Europe, introduced in South Africa.

References:
Wikipedia, Boletus reticulatus
First Nature




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