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Chloris chloris aurantiiventris Cabanis, 1851 ♂

Carduelis chloris-M-Cavo Gkreko.JPG <b><i>Chloris chloris aurantiiventris</i></b> Cabanis, 1851 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/03/22/20160322100522-e53345e8-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210741-e4e6a3a2-th.jpg><b><i>Chloris chloris aurantiiventris</i></b> Cabanis, 1851 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/03/22/20160322100522-e53345e8-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210741-e4e6a3a2-th.jpg><b><i>Chloris chloris aurantiiventris</i></b> Cabanis, 1851 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/03/22/20160322100522-e53345e8-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210741-e4e6a3a2-th.jpg><b><i>Chloris chloris aurantiiventris</i></b> Cabanis, 1851 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/03/22/20160322100522-e53345e8-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210741-e4e6a3a2-th.jpg>

Chloris chloris aurantiiventris Cabanis, 1851 ♂
Syn.: Carduelis chloris Linnaeus, 1758
Common names: European greenfinch, Greenfinch [En], Verdier d’Europe, Verdier [Fr], Groenling [Nl], Grünfink [De], Verdone europeo [It], Verderón común [Es], Φλώρος, [Gr], Λουλουδάς [Gr Cypriot], Florya [Tu]

IUCN Status: LC (Least Concern)

Cape Greco (Κάβο Γκρέκο), FAMAGUSTA (Αμμόχωστος, Gazimağusa) ● Cyprus

Taxonomy: Phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequence data indicated that the greenfinches were not closely related to other members of the Carduelis genus. They have therefore been placed in a separate genus Chloris.

Description: The greenfinch is 15 cm long with a wing span of 24.5 to 27.5 cm. It is similar in size and shape to a house sparrow, but is mainly green, with yellow in the wings and tail. The female and young birds are duller and have brown tones on the back. The bill is thick and conical. The song contains a lot of trilling twitters interspersed with wheezes, and the male has a butterfly display flight.

According Avibase, six subspecies are recognised:
C. c. chloris Linnaeus, 1758 – British Isles, Northern Europe, Corsica and Sardigna (winters to South Europe)
C. c. aurantiiventris Cabanis, 1851 – Southern Europe, including western Turkey and Cyprus (winters to North Africa)
C. c. vanmarli Voous, 1952 – lowlands of North Morocco
C. c. voousi Roselaar, 1993 – mountains of Morocco and Algeria
C. c. chlorotica Bonaparte, 1850 – Syria, Lebanon, Israel and Jordan (winters to Sinai Peninsula and Egypt)
C. c. turkestanica Zarudny, 1907 – Crimea to Caucasus, North Iran and Turkmenistan (winters to Southern Iran)

Biology: Breeding season occurs in spring, starting in the second half of March, until June, with fledging young in early July. It nests in trees or bushes, laying 3 to 6 eggs.
Incubation lasts about 13-14 days, by the female. Male feeds her at the nest during this period. Chicks are covered with thick, long, greyish-white down at hatching. They are fed on insect larvae by both adults during the first days, and later, by frequent regurgitated yellowish past of seeds. They leave the nest about 13 days later but they are not able to fly. Usually, they fledge 16–18 days after hatching. This species produces two or three broods per year.
This species can form large flocks outside the breeding season, sometimes mixing with other finches and buntings. They feed largely on seeds, but also take berries.

Habitat: Woodland edges, farmland hedges and gardens with relatively thick vegetation are favoured for breeding.

Distribution: This bird is widespread throughout Europe, north Africa and south west Asia. It is mainly resident, but some northernmost populations migrate further south. The greenfinch has also been introduced into both Australia and New Zealand.

References:
Wikipedia, European greenfinch
Avibase, Chloris chloris



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