Home / Birds / Fringillidae /

Carpodacus erythrinus kubanensis Laubmann, 1915 ♂

Carpodacus erythrinus-Olgunlar1.JPG <b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210743-23b40402-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carpodacus erythrinus kubanensis</b></i> Laubmann, 1915 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2017/07/27/20170727222639-7cc4ef1c-th.jpg><b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210743-23b40402-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carpodacus erythrinus kubanensis</b></i> Laubmann, 1915 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2017/07/27/20170727222639-7cc4ef1c-th.jpg><b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210743-23b40402-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carpodacus erythrinus kubanensis</b></i> Laubmann, 1915 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2017/07/27/20170727222639-7cc4ef1c-th.jpg><b><i>Carduelis spinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2014/12/26/20141226210743-23b40402-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Carpodacus erythrinus kubanensis</b></i> Laubmann, 1915 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2017/07/27/20170727222639-7cc4ef1c-th.jpg>

Carpodacus erythrinus kubanensis Laubmann, 1915 ♂
Common names: Common rosefinch, Scarlet rosefinch [En], Roselin cramoisi [Fr], Roodmus [Nl], Karmingimpel [De], Ciuffolotto scarlatto [It], Camachuelo carminoso [Es], Ροδόσπιζα, Κοτσινόσπιννος [Gr], Çütre [Tu]

IUCN Status: LC (Least Concern)

Olgunlar, ARTVİN ● Turkey

Description: The common rosefinch is 13–15 cm in length. It has a stout and conical bill. The mature male has brilliant rosy-carmine head, breast and rump; heavy bill; dark brown wings with two indistinct bars, and a white belly. Females and young males are dull-colored with yellowish-brown above, brighter on the rump and greyer on head; buff below.
Adults moult in their winter quarters, between September and November. After moulting the red of male is subdued, and becomes brighter during the winter due to wear of the feathers.

5 subspecies are recorded:
C. e. erythrinus Pallas, 1770 – North, Central and Eastern Europe to Central Siberia
C. e. grebnitskii Stejneger, 1885 – East Siberia, North Mongolia, North-East China and Korea
C. e. kubanensis Laubmann, 1915 – Turkey, the Caucasus, North Iran and Turkmenistan
C. e. ferghanensis Koslowa, 1939 – From East Kazakhstan to West China, West Himalayas, Pakistan and Afghanistan
C. e. roseatus Blyth, 1842 – Central and East Himalayas to Central and South China.

Biology: The breeding season is from May to August and the species in monogamous. The nest is a loose or untidy cup of twigs, plant stems and fibres, grass, flowerheads, plant down, moss, lichens and animal hair. It is set low down in a bush, juniper or spruce or willow sapling and is well hidden in a tangle of foliage or against a trunk, occasionally in scrub tangle and rarely on the ground. Clutches are four to six eggs. The diet is mainly plant and tree seeds, buds, catkins, shoots, leaves, fruit and berries but it will also take nectar, insects and their larvae and other arthropods. The species is migratory and partially migratory.

Habitat: This species is found in lowland to montane moist forests, woodlands and thickets of willows (Salix), alder (Alnus), poplar (Populus), tamarisks (Tamarix), scrub and bushes in taiga forest edges and clearings. It also occurs in riverine thickets, reedbeds and patches of bushes in meadows, forest edges, hedges, orchards, cherry (Prunus) trees and the edges of cultivation. In forest-steppe and higher areas of montane foothills it found in bracken (Pteridium), dwarf willows, juniper (Juniperus) and on bush-covered slopes with isolated birch (Betula) and firs (Abies). It even breeds in some city centres.

Distribution: It has spread westward through Europe in recent decades, even breeding in England once. Common rosefinches breed from the Danube valley, Sweden, and Siberia to the Bering Sea; the Caucasus, northern Iran and Afghanistan, the western Himalayas, Tibet and China; to Japan between latitudes 25° and 68°. In winter they are found from southern Iran to south-east China India, Burma, and South-East Asia.

References:
Wikipedia, Common rosefinch
BirdLife International, 2017. Carpodacus erythrinus, The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.



Visits
1701
Rate this photo

0 comments

Add a comment