Home / Lepidoptera / Noctuidae /

Acontia trabealis Scopoli, 1763

Acontia trabealis-Kato Poroia.jpg <b><i>Acontia lucida</b></i> Hufnagel, 1766||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/05/08/20130508223918-b5bd8cbc-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Acronicta rumicis</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/09/18/20160918211034-8dc3c4f6-th.jpg><b><i>Acontia lucida</b></i> Hufnagel, 1766||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/05/08/20130508223918-b5bd8cbc-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Acronicta rumicis</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/09/18/20160918211034-8dc3c4f6-th.jpg><b><i>Acontia lucida</b></i> Hufnagel, 1766||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/05/08/20130508223918-b5bd8cbc-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Acronicta rumicis</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/09/18/20160918211034-8dc3c4f6-th.jpg><b><i>Acontia lucida</b></i> Hufnagel, 1766||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2013/05/08/20130508223918-b5bd8cbc-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Acronicta rumicis</b></i> Linnaeus, 1758 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/09/18/20160918211034-8dc3c4f6-th.jpg>

Acontia trabealis Scopoli, 1763
Syn.: Emmelia trabealis Scopoli, 1763
Common names: Spotted sulphur [En], Arlequinette jaune [Fr], Panteruiltje [Nl], Ackerwinden-Bunteulchen [De]

Kato Poroia, SERRES ● Greece

Description: The wingspan can reach 18–24 mm. The forewings show a very variable black drawings on a yellowish or dirty white background. The rear wings are reddish brown in color.
Eggs are green, elongated and cone-shaped, with a flattened base and distinct longitudinal ribs. Caterpillars are reddish to greenish brown, with dark dorsal lines and a yellow side band, the head is relatively small and brown. Cocoons are red-brown or green.

Biology: This species presents two overlapping generations a year, the second generation is generally missing in cool years. The moth flies from May to August depending on the location and then again from August to early September. The pupa overwinters. The larvae feed on field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) and Polygonum species.

Habitat: Dry places, uncultivated sandy soils.

Distribution: Spotted Sulphur can be found in most of Europe, in North Africa, the Middle East and Russia to northern China, Korea and Japan. It was formerly resident in Great Britain before 1960, and is presumed extinct there.

References:
Wikipedia, Emmelia trabealis
Pyrgus.de




Visits
352
Rate this photo

0 comments

Add a comment