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Andrena thoracica Fabricius, 1775 ♀

Andrena thoracica-Ano Poroia2b.jpg <b><i>Picus viridis karelini</b></i> Brandt, 1841 ♀ (juvenile)||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/22/20190622120607-508eb732-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Andrena thoracica</b></i> Fabricius, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/30/20190630075921-8a0f2786-th.jpg><b><i>Picus viridis karelini</b></i> Brandt, 1841 ♀ (juvenile)||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/22/20190622120607-508eb732-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Andrena thoracica</b></i> Fabricius, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/30/20190630075921-8a0f2786-th.jpg><b><i>Picus viridis karelini</b></i> Brandt, 1841 ♀ (juvenile)||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/22/20190622120607-508eb732-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Andrena thoracica</b></i> Fabricius, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/30/20190630075921-8a0f2786-th.jpg><b><i>Picus viridis karelini</b></i> Brandt, 1841 ♀ (juvenile)||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/22/20190622120607-508eb732-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Andrena thoracica</b></i> Fabricius, 1775 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2019/06/30/20190630075921-8a0f2786-th.jpg>

Andrena thoracica Fabricius, 1775 ♀
Common names: Cliff Mining Bee [En], Zwartflankzandbij [Nl]

Ano Poroia, SERRES ● Greece

Description: This medium sized (13-15 mm) solitary bee is characterized by the reddish hair that covers the dorsal thorax and the black hairless abdomen.
Female are larger.

Biology: The species is bivoltine; from March to June and from July to September
There visited flowers visited include members of the Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Rosaceae, Onagraceae and Salicaceae.
Males patrol nesting areas, flying extremely quickly along the edge of cliffs, just below the top edge. The cuckoo-bee Nomada goodeniana (Perkins, 1919) and N. fulvicornis (Westrich, 1989) parasite this species.

Habitat: Open, sandy-grassland habitats, particularly on exposed vertical cliffs, which provide the favoured nesting sites. It may also use more level sandy areas.

Distribution: It is widespread, but rarely common, in Europe. It is also found throughout the steppe regions of Asia.

References:
BWARS, Bees, Wasps & Ants Recording Society,




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