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Papaver rhoeas L.

Papaver rhoas-Hamoir.jpg <b><i>Papaver pilosum</i></b> ssp. <b><i>spicatum</i></b> Boiss. & Bal.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/03/22/20110322175819-9f52a8b5-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Roemeria hybrida</b></i> (L.) DC., 1821||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/06/20111206201729-2b56bed3-th.jpg><b><i>Papaver pilosum</i></b> ssp. <b><i>spicatum</i></b> Boiss. & Bal.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/03/22/20110322175819-9f52a8b5-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Roemeria hybrida</b></i> (L.) DC., 1821||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/06/20111206201729-2b56bed3-th.jpg><b><i>Papaver pilosum</i></b> ssp. <b><i>spicatum</i></b> Boiss. & Bal.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/03/22/20110322175819-9f52a8b5-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Roemeria hybrida</b></i> (L.) DC., 1821||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/06/20111206201729-2b56bed3-th.jpg><b><i>Papaver pilosum</i></b> ssp. <b><i>spicatum</i></b> Boiss. & Bal.||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/03/22/20110322175819-9f52a8b5-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Roemeria hybrida</b></i> (L.) DC., 1821||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/12/06/20111206201729-2b56bed3-th.jpg>

Papaver rhoeas L.
Common names: Corn poppy, Corn rose, Field poppy, Flanders poppy, Red poppy, Red weed [En], Coquelicot [Fr], Grote klaproos [Nl], Klatschmohn [De], Papavero commune, Rosolaccio [It], Amapola Silvestre [Es], Παπαρούνα, Παπαρούνα η ροϊάς [Gr], Gelincik [Tu]

Hamoir ● Belgium

Description: The vibrant blood red blooms are supported by hairy stalks; the rounded petals are broader than they are long, and often have a dark spot at the base. Pink or white flowers may also occur. The stamens consist of violet coloured anthers borne on purplish-black filaments, and the stigma is a flattened disk with 8-14 rays. The branching stems are covered with stiff hairs, and the leaves are narrow and divided into toothed segments. Like many other species of Papaver, it exudes white latex when the tissues are broken.
The fruit is in the form of a capsule, capped by a disk; the small brown seeds are released via holes that open below the disk.

Biology: It forms a long-lived soil seed bank that can germinate when the soil is disturbed. In the northern hemisphere it generally flowers in late spring, but if the weather is warm enough other flowers frequently appear at the beginning of autumn.

Habitat: A 'weed' of arable fields, disturbed and open habitats, the poppy thrives best on light calcareous soils. It is often included in wild flower mixtures, and occurs in many areas as a garden escape. It is vulnerable to herbicides, and tends to occur mainly in field margins and strips of fields that have not been sprayed.

Distribution: Native to southern Europe, North Africa and temperate Asia, but has become naturalised outside of this range.

References:
Wikipedia, Papaver rhoeas
Clapham, A.R., Tutin, T.G. & Moore, D.M., 1987. Flora of the British Isles. 3rd Edition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Press, B. & Gibbons, B, 1993. Photographic field guide to wild flowers of Britain and Europe. New Holland Publishers (UK) Ltd, London.
Preston, C.D., Pearman, D.A. & Dines, T.D., 2002. The New Atlas of the British and Irish Flora. Oxford University Press, Oxford.





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