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Hylotrupes bajulus Linnaeus, 1758 ♀

Hylotrupes bajulus-F-Küçükbahçe.jpg <b><i>Clytus lama</b></i> Mulsant, 1847 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/08/20/20120820195645-57270136-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Leptura aurulenta</b></i> Fabricius, 1792 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/07/31/20160731104258-cec26b65-th.jpg><b><i>Clytus lama</b></i> Mulsant, 1847 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/08/20/20120820195645-57270136-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Leptura aurulenta</b></i> Fabricius, 1792 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/07/31/20160731104258-cec26b65-th.jpg><b><i>Clytus lama</b></i> Mulsant, 1847 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/08/20/20120820195645-57270136-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Leptura aurulenta</b></i> Fabricius, 1792 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/07/31/20160731104258-cec26b65-th.jpg><b><i>Clytus lama</b></i> Mulsant, 1847 ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2012/08/20/20120820195645-57270136-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Leptura aurulenta</b></i> Fabricius, 1792 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/07/31/20160731104258-cec26b65-th.jpg>

Hylotrupes bajulus Linnaeus, 1758 ♀
Common names: House Longhorn Beetle, Old House Borer, European House Borer [En], Capricorne des maisons [Fr], Huisboktor [Nl], Hausbockkäfer [De], Cerambicido de la madera labrada [Es], Konakdelen [Tu]

Küçükbahçe, İZMİR ● Turkey

Description: The adult females of Hylotrupes bajulus may reach a length of 25 mm, but the males are only about half as long. The adults are slightly flattened, grayish black to very dark brownish black, with many gray or yellowish-gray hairs on the head and anterior part of the body. However, these may be rubbed off on older specimens. Two elevated black, shiny knobs on the prothorax give the dorsum an appearance like a face with a pair of eyes. About a third of the way posterior on the elytra, and centrally located, there are 2 grayish, transverse marks.

Biology : The adults may remain in the tunnels prepared by the larvae for 7 to 10 months before emerging, but then live for only a brief period. They appear in the summer, and oviposition takes place at that time. Most of the period is spent in the larval stage, for the egg and pupal stages each last only about 2 weeks, and the adults live 8 to 16 days.
About 150 to 200 white to grayish-white, spindleshaped eggs about 2 mm long are laid in checks, cracks, crevices, or irregularities of the wood. Stacks of lumber are said to be excellent oviposition sites. It takes 2 or 3 weeks for the eggs to hatch. The larvae feed in the dry sapwood from 2 to 10 years (usually 3 to 5) until the sapwood is completely destroyed.

Habitat: Old-house borers prefer seasoned softwoods, and particularly pine.

Distribution: European house borer is a native of northern Africa, but is now widespread, with a range which includes Europe, North and South America, South Africa, Asia Minor, China and Russia (Durr 1954; Duffy 1968).

References:
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