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Athous haemorrhoidalis Fabricius, 1801

Athous haemorrhoidalis-Meise.jpg <i><b>Athous haemorrhoidalis</i></b> Fabricius, 1801Thumbnails<b><i>Athous vittatus</i></b> Fabricius, 1792<i><b>Athous haemorrhoidalis</i></b> Fabricius, 1801Thumbnails<b><i>Athous vittatus</i></b> Fabricius, 1792<i><b>Athous haemorrhoidalis</i></b> Fabricius, 1801Thumbnails<b><i>Athous vittatus</i></b> Fabricius, 1792<i><b>Athous haemorrhoidalis</i></b> Fabricius, 1801Thumbnails<b><i>Athous vittatus</i></b> Fabricius, 1792

Athous haemorrhoidalis Fabricius, 1801
Common names: Taupin brun [Fr], Rotbauchiger Laubschnellkäfer [De]

Meise, BRABANT ● Belgium

Description: Approximately 15 mm long, it is an elongated species with a relatively long pronotum. The elytra are a red/brown colour with a slightly darker line running down the centre. The elytra are shallowly pitted in rows down their lengths. The pronotum is a noticeably darker brown than the elytra. There is a dense covering of lighter brown hairs. The legs are similar in colour to the elytra, lightening on the tarsi. The antennae are slightly shorter than the length of the head and pronotum.
Head densely punctured although this is sometimes sparse on the vertex, with pale, forwardly directed and recumbent pubescence. Eyes convex and round or with a weak sinuation behind antennal insertions. Antennae 11 segmented and dark, inserted on front of head under raised margins of clypeus. This species can be separate from A. vittatus on the colour of the first antennal segment; entirely black in A. haemorrhoidalis and entirely yellow in A. vittatus. First segment broad with strongly curved inner edge, second distinctly shorter than third, third slightly shorter than fourth, 4-10 weakly dentate.

Biology : Like all click beetles, it can flick itself into the air when laid on its back - an action which makes a click sound.
The larval stage lasts at least two years, after which pupation occurs in June or July, the insect eclosing shortly after in August. The imago overwinters in the pupal case underground, subsequently emerging in May or June of the following year. Imago insects can be readily found resting on flowers of various species (particularly Umbellifers) and by beating a large number of tree species, both broadleaves and conifers. The larvae feed on roots and can become a pest of root crops.

Habitat: Ubiquitous, occuring in a wide range of habitats including broadleaved, mixed and coniferous woodland, grasslands, parks and gardens, coastal areas and agricultural land.

Distribution: Western and Northern Europe, from Portugal to Finland.

References:
Elateridae of the British Isles
Watford Coleoptera Group
Nature Spot




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