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Salticus scenicus Clerck, 1757 ♀

Salticus scenicus-Hamoir.jpg <b><i>Salticus cingulatus</b></i> Panzer, 1797 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/04/20151004124730-2318922f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Salticus scenicus</i></b> Clerck, 1757 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/01/26/20110126001548-604e7da5-th.jpg><b><i>Salticus cingulatus</b></i> Panzer, 1797 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/04/20151004124730-2318922f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Salticus scenicus</i></b> Clerck, 1757 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/01/26/20110126001548-604e7da5-th.jpg><b><i>Salticus cingulatus</b></i> Panzer, 1797 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/04/20151004124730-2318922f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Salticus scenicus</i></b> Clerck, 1757 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/01/26/20110126001548-604e7da5-th.jpg><b><i>Salticus cingulatus</b></i> Panzer, 1797 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/04/20151004124730-2318922f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Salticus scenicus</i></b> Clerck, 1757 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/2011/01/26/20110126001548-604e7da5-th.jpg>

Salticus scenicus Clerck, 1757 ♀
Common names: Zebra spider [En], Saltique chevronné, Saltique arlequin [Fr], Huiszebraspin [Nl], Zebraspringspinne [De]

Hamoir, LIEGE ● Belgium

Description: The body length of the male is 4.0-7.0 mm, the female 5.5-7.5 mm.
These tiny spiders are black with white hairs that form stripes.
The prosoma is black, shiny metallic, with 2 pairs of white spots. The opisthosoma is black, shiny metallic, the anterior margin white, dorsally 2 white stripes running toward the middle.
The most distinctive feature of these spiders is their two very large eyes, which is typical for jumping spiders. Although they have eight eyes, the two at the front are the largest and give them excellent binocular vision.

Biology : Zebra spiders tend to hunt insects or spiders of roughly their own size or smaller. They have been observed feeding on mosquitos that are almost twice their length. They have also been observed taking on prey items up to 3 times the length of the spider, such as some of the smaller species of moth. Like other jumping spiders, these spiders use their large front eyes to locate and stalk their prey. They move slowly towards their prey until they are close enough to pounce on top of their victim, and their hunting behaviour has been described as cat-like. Using their acute eyesight, they are able to accurately judge the distances they need to jump.
When these spiders meet, the male carries out a courtship dance involving waving his front legs and moving his abdomen up and down. The better the dance the more likely the female will want to mate, although arachnologists have yet to discover what it is the female looks for in a mating dance. Females will stay with their egg sacs and will guard the young after they hatch. After the spiderlings have had their second moult they will leave the mother and fend for themselves.

Habitat: They often live close to or in human settlements. They can be found on walls, plants and fences on sunny days; and also indoors on window sills, often in the corner behind curtains.

Distribution: Zebra spiders are widespread across Britain, Europe, and North America, and are found throughout the Holarctic.

References:
Arkive
Wikipedia, Zebra Spider
Nentwig W, Blick T, Gloor D, Hänggi A, Kropf C, Spiders of Europe, www.araneae.unibe.ch.






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