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Podarcis milensis Bedriaga, 1882 ♂

Podarcis milensis-M3.jpg <b><i>Ophrys gortynia</b></i> (H. Baumann & Künkele) H.F. Paulus, 1988||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/04/17/20150417213131-c743cb4d-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Podarcis milensis</i></b> Bedriaga, 1882 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/10/17/20111017204335-0b64a76b-th.jpg><b><i>Ophrys gortynia</b></i> (H. Baumann & Künkele) H.F. Paulus, 1988||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/04/17/20150417213131-c743cb4d-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Podarcis milensis</i></b> Bedriaga, 1882 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/10/17/20111017204335-0b64a76b-th.jpg><b><i>Ophrys gortynia</b></i> (H. Baumann & Künkele) H.F. Paulus, 1988||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/04/17/20150417213131-c743cb4d-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Podarcis milensis</i></b> Bedriaga, 1882 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/10/17/20111017204335-0b64a76b-th.jpg><b><i>Ophrys gortynia</b></i> (H. Baumann & Künkele) H.F. Paulus, 1988||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/04/17/20150417213131-c743cb4d-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Podarcis milensis</i></b> Bedriaga, 1882 ♂||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/10/17/20111017204335-0b64a76b-th.jpg>

Podarcis milensis Bedriaga, 1882 ♂
Common names: Miles Wall Lizard, Milos Wall Lizard [En], Lézard de Milos [Fr], Milos-Mauereidechse [De], Γουστέρα της Μήλου [Gr]

Adamas, MILOS ● Greece

IUCN Status: Vulnerable (VU)

Endemic species

Description: The lizard's body length is no more than 6.5 cm, and the tail is twice as long. The lizard looks sturdy, and has a broad head. The male's appearance is characteristic for the species. The back is usually brown, and has a slight longitudinal line in the middle of it. Flanks, throat and the sides of the head are black with white, yellow, blue or light green spots. The belly has often black patterning. A typical female has white stripes on the edges of its back, and some distinctive spots in the throat.
Podarcis gaigeae was separated from this species by Gruber (1986). Although this status was not recognized by Gasc et al. (1997), it is supported by additional genetic results (Harris and Arnold 1999).

Biology : It remains active all year. Mating behaviour and copulation start from January and last until July but occur mainly during spring. It is a multiple brooded species. Female seems to lay eggs from the middle of March and continue until the end of August.

Habitat: It can be found in open areas of traditionally cultivated land, open scrubland, sand dune systems and damp marshy coastal areas. The females lay repeated small clutches of one to three eggs. It can be abundant in coastal areas.

Distribution: This species is endemic to the Aegean islands of Greece, where it is restricted to the Milos archipelago (Milos, Kimolos, Polyaigos and Antimilos), the Ananes archipelago, Falkonera island and Velopoula island. It ranges from sea level up to 685m asl. It is the only small larcertid in this area.

Protection Listed as Vulnerable because its area of occupancy is very small (probably <20 km²), and it is plausible that the species is vulnerable to stochastic events.
This species was threatened by overcollection of animals in the past but this is no longer considered to be a threat.
It is listed on Annex II of the Bern Convention. Its range includes a few protected areas covering part or all of the islands on which it is found.

References:
Lymberakis P., 2008. Podarcis milensis. In: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
Adamopoulou C., Valakos E.D., Legakis A., 1997. Reproduction in the Greek endemic lizard Podarcis milensis(Sauria: Lacertidae), 3rd Word Congress of Herpetology, Prague.



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