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Chlorophyllum rhacodes (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002

Chlorophyllum rhacodes-Meise3.jpg <i><b>Lycogala epidendrum</i></b> (J.C. Buxb. ex L.) Fr. 1829||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111114703-623bba1a-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Chlorophyllum rhacodes</i></b>  (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/10/20111110190654-67a1795f-th.jpg><i><b>Lycogala epidendrum</i></b> (J.C. Buxb. ex L.) Fr. 1829||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111114703-623bba1a-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Chlorophyllum rhacodes</i></b>  (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/10/20111110190654-67a1795f-th.jpg><i><b>Lycogala epidendrum</i></b> (J.C. Buxb. ex L.) Fr. 1829||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111114703-623bba1a-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Chlorophyllum rhacodes</i></b>  (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/10/20111110190654-67a1795f-th.jpg><i><b>Lycogala epidendrum</i></b> (J.C. Buxb. ex L.) Fr. 1829||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111114703-623bba1a-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Chlorophyllum rhacodes</i></b>  (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/10/20111110190654-67a1795f-th.jpg><i><b>Lycogala epidendrum</i></b> (J.C. Buxb. ex L.) Fr. 1829||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111114703-623bba1a-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Chlorophyllum rhacodes</i></b>  (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/10/20111110190654-67a1795f-th.jpg><i><b>Lycogala epidendrum</i></b> (J.C. Buxb. ex L.) Fr. 1829||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/11/20111111114703-623bba1a-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Chlorophyllum rhacodes</i></b>  (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/10/20111110190654-67a1795f-th.jpg>

Chlorophyllum rhacodes (Vittad. 1835) Vellinga, 2002
Family : Agaricaceae
Common names: Shaggy parasol [En], Lépiote déguenillée [Fr], Knolparasolzwam [Nl], Safranschirmling, Safran-Riesenschirmpilz [De], Apagador menor [Es]

Meise, BRABANT ● Belgium

Taxonomy: Chlorophyllum rhacodes, C. Olivieri and C. brunneum were formerly known as Macrolepiota rhacodes or Lepiota rhacodes, but the name was changed on the basis of molecular phylogenetic evidence demonstrating a closer relationship to Chlorophyllum molybdites than to Macrolepiota procera. The subspecies Macrolepiota rhacodes var. brunneum was also elevated to species status as Chlorophyllum brunneum.

Description: The shaggy parasol is a large and conspicuous agaric, with thick brown scales and protuberances on its fleshy white cap. The gills and spore print are both white in colour. Its stipe is slender, but bulbous at the base, is coloured uniformly and bears no patterns. It is fleshy, and a reddish, or maroon discoloration occurs and a pungent odour is evolved when it is cut. The egg-shaped caps become wider and flatter as they mature.
The stem of C. rhacodes grows to 10 to 20 cm (4 to 8 in) tall. The cap grows to 7.5 to 20 cm (3 to 8 in) across, while the stipe has a diameter of 1 to 2 centimetres.

The shaggy parasol is similar in appearance to the similarly edible parasol mushroom, Macrolepiota procera. The latter grows considerably larger however, and is more likely to be found in the open than C. rhacodes which prefers more shade and dislikes open pastures and fields. Another distinguishing feature is that C. rhacodes lacks the brown bands that are on the stem of M. procera.

Habitat: It grows in troops or fairy rings in disturbed ground areas like roadsides, gardens, the edges of fields, and so on--often in the vicinity of conifers

Distribution: Europe, North America .

Uses: Chlorophyllum rhacodes is edible. However, it contains toxins which can cause gastric upsets when eaten raw or undercooked, and some individuals show a strong allergic response even after cooking.
Furthermore, young shaggy parasols look identical to the poisonous Chlorophyllum molybdites. This mushroom causes the most poisonings in North America yearly. Checking the spore print is essential as C. molybdites' print is green (older specimens have slightly green gills). As a result, this mushroom is not recommended for inexperienced hunters.

References:
Wikipedia, Shaggy parasol
Mushroom Expert




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