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Scleroderma citrinum Pers., 1801.

Scleroderma citrinum-Tervuren2.jpg <i><b>Amanita muscaria</i></b> (L.: Fr.) Lam. 1783||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/13/20111113121107-ae7db3e9-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Phallus impudicus</i></b> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/12/20111112205718-5dcf5b71-th.jpg><i><b>Amanita muscaria</i></b> (L.: Fr.) Lam. 1783||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/13/20111113121107-ae7db3e9-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Phallus impudicus</i></b> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/12/20111112205718-5dcf5b71-th.jpg><i><b>Amanita muscaria</i></b> (L.: Fr.) Lam. 1783||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/13/20111113121107-ae7db3e9-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Phallus impudicus</i></b> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/12/20111112205718-5dcf5b71-th.jpg><i><b>Amanita muscaria</i></b> (L.: Fr.) Lam. 1783||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/13/20111113121107-ae7db3e9-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Phallus impudicus</i></b> Linnaeus, 1753||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/12/20111112205718-5dcf5b71-th.jpg>

Scleroderma citrinum Pers., 1801.
Family: Sclerodermataceae
Common names: Common earthball, Pigskin poison puffball [En], Scléroderme vulgaire, Scléroderme citron, Scléroderme orangé [Fr], Gele aardappelbovist [Nl], Dickschaliger Kartoffelbovist [De]

Tervuren, BRABANT ● Belgium

Description: Earthballs are superficially similar to, and considered look-alikes of the edible puffball, but whereas the Puffball has a single opening on top through which the spores are dispersed, the earthball just breaks up to release the spores. Moreover, Scleroderma citrinum has much firmer flesh and a dark gleba (interior) much earlier in development than puffballs. Scleroderma citrinum has no stem but is attached to the soil by mycelial cords. The peridium, or outer wall, is thick and firm, usually ochre yellow externally with irregular warts.

Biology : Can be seen from Autumn to Winter.

Habitat: Woods, heathland and in short grass.

Distribution: Europe, North America.

Caution: Ingestion of Scleroderma citrinum can cause gastrointestinal distress in humans and animals, and some individuals may experience lacrimation, rhinitis and rhinorrhea, and conjunctivitis from exposure to its spores.

References:
Wikipedia, Scleroderma citrinum



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